ganley.org -> Woodworking -> Rolling Shop Cabinet

Rolling Shop Cabinet

This rolling shop cabinet was based pretty closely on the New Yankee Workshop version. The main difference is that I replaced the cabinet part with two more drawers. Total cost was around $70; the top is a piece of Formica that the previous owner of our house left behind, saving me $10 or so. I used AC fir plywood instead of the cabinet-grade birch that Norm used (good choice -- not as pretty, but half the price), and I used half-inch BC for the drawer backs, sides, and bottoms (bad choice -- stick with AC, the inner plies of this BC stuff are real crud).

Since I don't have a router table, I couldn't join the drawer sides to the fronts with a sliding dovetail like Norm did. I wanted to do a locking rabbet, but that BC plywood was too cruddy to do that with. So, I ended up just cutting dados in the drawer fronts and gluing and toenailing the sides into them. It seems pretty solid; we'll see how it holds up over time.

Other than some simple household carpentry, this was my first woodworking project. Considering that, I think it came out pretty well. It's not quite perfect, but I didn't make any bad mistakes either. Here are a few things that I learned doing this project:

By the way, I was motivated to do this as a first project because my "workbench" is a door on sawhorses, which I set up in the doorway of my garage (someday soon I'll build a rolling table to replace this, such as Norm's work table or this drop-leaf mobile workbench). Working on that surface, I need another surface behind me on which to put down my tools; if I set them down on the workbench, they're always in the way of the work. The rolling cabinet was a perfect solution; I can set things on it while I work, and I can store my most-used tools in it so I don't have to go across the room for them.

Also, I figure shop furniture is an excellent learning platform, since if it's not quite perfect, hey, it's just shop furniture. Next project will be a router table, and then some sort of workshop hutch.

Finally, I can call myself a woodworker, instead of just a guy who watches a lot of New Yankee Workshop.